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SYS-CON Events announced today that IBM  has been named “Diamond Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 21st Cloud Expo, which will take place on October 31 through November 2nd 2017 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, California. Hybrid Cloud Transformation: New Platforms, Technologies and Solutions View Keynote ▸ Here Download Slide Deck ▸ Here In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. View Keynote ▸ Here Download Slide Deck ▸ Here In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President of D... (more)

IBM Named "Diamond Sponsor" of @CloudExpo NY and CA | #AI #DX #DevOps

SYS-CON Events announced today that IBM has been named “Diamond Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 20th Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017 at the Javits Center in New York, New York and and October 31-November 2 in Silicon Valley. Hybrid Cloud Transformation: New Platforms, Technologies and Solutions View Keynote ▸ Here Download Slide Deck ▸ Here In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. View Keynote ▸ Here Download Slide Deck ▸ Here In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President o... (more)

General Best Practices for WebSphere Application Environments

This article provides a list of general best practices to apply to any WebSphere Application Server V7 and V8 environment. However, some of the recommendations only apply to specific conditions and scenarios. These recommendations could be used to set up any WebSphere environment. General Best Practices for WebSphere Application Environments 1. All WebSphere Application processes should be running as non-admin/root user. It's not a good practice to run a process as an admin/root user. For obvious reasons, you don't want more folks to know about the admin/root password and generally the WebSphere admins are not the system admins. Create a services user account on the box and use it for the WebSphere Application's start and stop purposes. 2. Enabled Global Security. By default, the WebSphere Application Server enables administrative security. Thus, for the most part, t... (more)

WebSphere Users Group Fills Knowledge Gap

The quest for knowledge and the opportunity to share experiences with WebSphere is evident with the successful launch last year of Canada's first WebSphere Users Group. Established with just 30 members, the Southern Ontario WebSphere Users Group has grown by leaps and bounds to 180 members ranging across all industries and organization sizes. Brought together by the common goals of building a network and increasing their knowledge base, the WebSphere Users Group will further expand by merging with a local MQSeries Users Group. Membership of the merged group will top 300 and be composed of developers, architects, designers, managers, and administrators. The aim of the joint group is to promote knowledge and technical understanding of the IBM WebSphere family of products and to focus on common issues and experiences. More importantly, the users group provides an op... (more)

Using the IBM WebSphere Application Server, Advanced Edition

In previous chapters, we learned how to use the IBM WebSphere Test Environment (WTE) inside VisualAge for Java to create and to test servlets. Now we need to understand how to use our servlets outside a test environment. This can be accomplished by deploying our servlets to the IBM WebSphere Application Server, Advanced Edition (WASAE). The WTE is used at development time, whereas the WASAE is used for staging or production purposes. About the Book Enterprise Javatm Programming with IBM WebSphere (with CD-ROM) By Kyle Brown, Gary Craig, Greg Hester, Jaime Niswonger, David Pitt, Russell Stinehour Addison Wesley Professional ISBN 0201616173 $44.95 You may purchase this book with a 10% discount at: www.informit.com/promo/wsdj The IBM WebSphere Application Server, Advanced Edition, provides the necessary tools to deliver J2EE-based applications. The IBM WASAE allows a ma... (more)

Birth of a Platform: Interview with Don Ferguson, "The Father of WebSphere"Part 2 of a 3-part series

In the last issue (WSDJ, Vol. 1, issue 2) Jack and Pat Martin, editors of WebSphere Developer's Journal, spoke with Don Ferguson about the beginnings of the WebSphere platform. This month, they look at Portal Server and what's happening with WebSphere today. WSDJ: What's your view on Portal Server? DF: Portal Server is the most significant enhancement to the WebSphere family in a long time. It's a great product. WSDJ: What are the most significant points about Web-Sphere Portal Server? DF: The first clever decision was to base it on the Portlet concept from the Apache Jetspeed project. The reason for that is if you are a portal and you cannot be transparently and independently extended by someone who wants to provide content, you're not going to be much of a portal. The Portlet model gave people an open way of adding elements to portal pages. Every other vendor's appro... (more)

Who Is Leading Who In the App Server Market? --IBM Delivers Version 5 of WebSphere, Claims Now To Be Joint Leader in Terms of

(December 4, 2002) - What's being described if you are told that reconnection and recovery is automatic, and requires no intervention from an administrator? Or how about if you're told that for bigger enterprises and more mission-critical applications, there's a network deployment option? The answer is IBM WebSphere, the infrastructure software that has been gaining ground on the lead previously enjoyed by BEA Systems with its WebLogic family of products. In fact with the newly released version 5 of WebSphere, just out, some analysts are beginning to spculate that IBM may have pulled level with BEA and is now tieing them as market share leader. IBM WebSphere Application Server, Version 5, and its development environment, WebSphere Studio, Version 5, provide the standards-based infrastructure to integrate business processes across the enterprise and with partners, sup... (more)

The Evolving Role of WebSphere

Development tools like WebSphere Studio, according to IBM's Scott Hebner, have changed "from being almost rogue initiatives with a lot of customers driven by a couple of departments into really being strategic investments now." And the entire usage of tools like this, and of application servers overall, has, he notes, changed. WebSphere Developer's Journal editor-in-chief Jack Martin had the opportunity recently to engage with Hebner's entire team, the team behind marketing IBM's WebSphere infrastructure software, in a wide-ranging and exclusive discussion. In this first installment, topics raised include networking challenges, Web services, RAD, the implications of the Eclipse technology pioneered by IBM two years ago, and the dynamics of IBM's on-demand application infrastructure. Most surprising of all is the revelation that WebSphere Studio will soon support th... (more)

Solutions, Not Technology, Drive WebSphere Products

Customer involvement at all stages of product development, including early access for independent solution vendors, is crucial to IBM's strategy for managing the WebSphere Application Server development process, according to the WebSphere marketing team, headed up by Scott Hebner, director of marketing for WebSphere infrastructure software. The WebSphere marketing team includes Joe Anthony, program director for WebSphere Extensions marketing; Derek Bildfell, program director for business development; Aimee Munsell, program director for WebSphere Application Server; Bernie Spang, program director for WebSphere Studio marketing; and Stefan Van Overtveldt, program director for WebSphere Technical Marketing. WebSphere Developer's Journal editor-in-chief Jack Martin recently had the opportunity to talk with Hebner and his team in a wide-ranging and exclusive discussion. ... (more)

WebSphere and Database Performance Tuning

In a business environment defined by requirements to elevate service levels while reducing IT operational costs, developers seek proven strategies to optimize the production runtime environment of their WebSphere Application Server implementations. The nearly universal objective of IT leaders today is to improve application performance and maximize the environment's ability to support broad business objectives. In the May issue of WebSphere Developer's Journal [Vol. 2, issue 5], I presented the first of a two-part series that provides strategies for tuning network and database interfaces to optimize IBM WebSphere Application Server implementations. That article discussed best practices for database connection pooling, prepared statement cache, and session persistence. In this article, I present best practices and tuning techniques for EJBs (Enterprise JavaBeans), J... (more)

Teamwork in WebSphere Studio - Software configuration management makes it easy

So what does teamwork in WebSphere Studio mean anyway? At one level it means being able to work on code within a shared environment through which your application can be executed and tested. WebSphere Studio already has great support for the deployment and testing of such shared development. At another level, however, it means being able to share the development effort itself. Software configuration management (SCM) is one means through which development effort can be shared. Even prior to deployment and testing, developers can become aware of other developers' changes and assess their impact. With a good SCM tool, this form of interaction can take place between developers even in separate geographic locations and time zones - all in a controlled manner. Along with actual code changes, the history and the design reasoning can be preserved, and there is an overall imp... (more)